Ruben Ochoa (Los Angeles) and B.J. Vogt (St. Louis)

Through February 15, 2014

Ochoa’s forms rise like the skeleton of the tripods from a War of the Worlds machine. One of L.A.'s most notable young sculptors, Ochoa employs a grittily vernacular formal lexicon (walls, fences, concrete, the materials of road building, manufacturing and construction) -- though instilled with elements of playfulness, elegance and grace rarely achieved by, say, the Missouri Department of Transportation. The piece is a beautifully nimble concoction of pallet and rebar, suggesting the gleeful liberation of a construction yard.  B.J. Vogt’s narrow shelf of sandwiched 2x4 beams present a horizon line that cuts the exhibition space in two, unhooking the ceiling from the floor. Between the 2x4’s layers of color ooze out like the exhalation from empty space as painterly ectoplasm. This disorientation is partly due to the loss of a stable horizon. With the loss of horizon also comes the departure of a stable paradigm of orientation, which has situated concepts of subject and object, of time and space. Our traditional sense of orientation—and, with it, modern concepts of time and space—are based on a stable line: the horizon line. Its stability hinges on the stability of an observer, even if in fact he is not.

En Español

Las formas de Ochoa suben como el esqueleto de los tres patas de una machina de La Guerra de los Mundos. Uno de los esculptores más notable de L.A., Ochoa empla un vernaculo bruto (murallas, cemento, materials de construir calles, fabricacion y construcción) – aun lleno de elementos de alegria, elegancia, y gracia jamas logrado por, di, el Departamento de Transporte de Missouri. Esta obra es una maravillosamente agil mezcla de paleta y barras de resfuerzo, sugieriendo el alegre libertad de una zona de construcción. B.J. Vogt’s plataformas estrechas hechos de 2x4 vigas de madera se presentan como una linea horizonatal que corta la exposición por la mitaz, separando el techo del suelo. Entre las capas de madera, como un residuo de color que rezuma como el exhale de espacio vacío. Este desorientación es debido en parte a la pérdida de un horizonte estable. Con la pérdida del horizonte viene una ida de un ejemplo de estabilidad, que tiene conceptos concretos de sujeto y objecto, del tiempo y del espacio. Nuestro sentido tradicional de orientación – y, con ella, conceptos modernos de tiempo y espacio – establecido en una línea estable: la línea del horizonte. Su estabilidad depende de la estabilidad de un observador, aunque el alomejor no lo es. 

 


ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES
Ruben Ochoa graduated from the University of California, Irvine, with an MFA in 2003. A new monumental sculpture, “Flock in Space,” is featured in the October 2013 exhibition, “Nasher XCHANGE: 10+ Celebration,” curated by Jeremy Strick at the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX. His work has been featured in solo exhibitions at Locust Projects, Miami, FL; the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, CA; at the Charles H. Scott Gallery at Emily Carr University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and at SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM.  Group exhibitions include “The Artist’s Museum: Los Angeles Artists 1980-2010”, at the Geffen Contemporary, MOCA, Los Angeles; “The Future Generation Art Prize @ Venice” Pinchuk Art Centre, Venice, Italy; and the 2008 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. Ochoa has also had exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; Miami Art Museum, Miami, Florida; Instituto Cervantes, Madrid, Spain; Haubrok Foundation, Berlin, Germany; The Center for Contemporary Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; and the 2004 California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA, among others. He received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship in 2008 and was nominated for the Pinchuk Art Centre’s Future Generation Art Prize in Venice, Italy in 2011. In 2014 Ochoa will have a solo exhibition as part of the Wadsworth Atheneum’s prestigious MATRIX program. 


B.J. Vogt lives and works in St. Louis, Missouri where he received a Master of Fine Arts Degree with an emphasis in Sculpture in 2006 from Washington University in St. Louis. He has also been the recipient of a Critical Mass for the Arts Creative Stimulus grant, a Santo Foundation Individual Artist Award and, in conjunction with a residency at the Cite’ Internationale des Arts in Paris, France, the 2006 Bill Kohn Travel Scholarship from Washington University in St. Louis. His work has been featured in group and solo exhibitions in cities including: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and St. Louis. Most recently he participated in the Natural and the Manufactured residency with a culminating exhibition at the Klondike Institute for Art and Culture in Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada.


Jerry Monteith (St. Louis) & Yamini Nayar (New York) 

 

March 29 –May 31, 2014

 

To see a world in a grain of sand

And heaven in a wild flower

Hold infinity in the palm of your hand

And eternity in an hour—William Blake

 

In Duet’s second exhibition Yamini Nayar and Jerry Monteith explore the vertigo inducing ecstasy of dramatic scale shifts. The monumental and the microscopic collide in both 2D and 3D forms where it becomes difficult to tell where surface and volume begin and end. Nayar’s photographic work compresses space combined with an astonishing set of collaged figure ground reversals as a paradoxical sense of order emerges like a pyroclastic force from otherwise scrambled bric-a-brac. Monteith starts small and continues to pare down to what seems like a sub-atomic vanishing point. The effect of Monteith’s grain-like ‘Attractor’ series evokes Blake’s “hold infinity in the palm of your hand” as Nayar’s Chrysalis provides the embodiment of “eternity in an hour”.

 

Yamini Nayar was born in Rochester, NY in 1975. She received her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts, New York. Nayar has exhibited internationally, including solo shows at Amrita Jhaveri Gallery, Mumbai, India and the Thomas Erben Gallery, New York and group exhibitions at the School of Visual Arts, New York and the Cincinnati Art Museum. Other recent exhibitions and published projects include the Yerba Buena Center, San Francisco; Sharjah Biennial; NADA, Art Basel; Galerie Anne Baurault, Paris; Indian Art Summit, and Saatchi Gallery, London. Her photographs are in private and public collections, including the Saatchi Collection, Queens Museum, Cincinnati Art Museum, and the US Arts in Embassies. She was recently awarded residencies at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace, New York and the CPW Photography Residency, New York. Nayar currently lives and works in Brooklyn. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and magazines including Unfixed: Postcolonial Photography in Contemporary Art (Jap Sam Books, 2013); and Manual for Treason: Sharjah Biennial (2011), the New York Times, New Yorker Magazine, Art India, Artforum, Art in America, Frieze, Vogue India, Artpapers, and Art Economist. She is the recipient of a 2014 Art Matters grant.

 

Jerry Monteith is Head of Graduate Studies, School of Art & Design, Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He received his MFA in Sculpture, Cranbrook Academy of Art, and his BFA in Sculpture from University of North Carolina. His work has been shown at OK Harris Gallery, New York; Nicolaysen Art Museum, Casper, Wyoming; McCutchan Art Center, University of Southern Indiana, Evansville; Art Space Gallery, Fresno City College, Fresno; Gallery 210, University of Missouri – St. Louis; Dallas Contemporary, Dallas, Texas, 2004 Southern Illinois Biennial, Mitchell Museum, Mt. Vernon, Illinois, Douglas Dibble Memorial Exhibit, Hunter College, New York, Dolphin Gallery, Kansas City; Chicago Botanical Garden, Chicago; Paducah 96, Yeiser Art Center, Paducah, Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, Wilmington among others. He is currently Professor of Art and Head of Graduate Studies, School of Art & Design, Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

 

 

The Point of ‘Différence’: Marta Pierobon (Brescia, Italy) 

and Brett Williams (St. Louis)

Curated by Rebecca Harris (London)

 

June 27 - August 23, 2014

 

Only at this point have either Brett Williams or Marta Pierobon decided exactly what works they will present and how, for the culmination of a project that is set to continue beyond this exhibition. The thematic premise has become lost and then found in the wilderness of engagement, of moving in the other’s physical working spaces.The show acts as an attempt to engage with what practice might be as well as approach forms of engagement as a method for testing the assumptions of reading around and interpretation of art.

 

Seeing this an opportunity to test their distinct practices based on the experience of working far away and then very much alongside one another in St. Louis, the decision of what is being presented – or in the case of Pierobon, made in the week running up to the show – has come out of conversations, studio visits, and the experience of recognising and ignoring the disparities of experience as much as the issues of activating that thinking and working space, based on geographical location. This exhibition culminates after several months of scattered online conversations, emails, and instant messages: aspects of which one might recognise in each artist’s work as presented and the way in which the show is curated in the space. While Williams presents examples of his practice that might be familiar to viewers here, one can find something unexpected by this pairing with Pierobon: the possibility for both artists’ practices to evolve is therefore based on a form of non-participatory collaboration. Specific conversations that have come up over the two week have evolved around the the functionality of the contemporary art world and its markets, with discussions on how the art world shares images, videos and writing, resulting in a shared value of direct engagement as much as an understanding of the impossibility to grasp an encompassing sense of either practice without direct engagement with the work, and perhaps as well as the artist in person. This show therefore acts a testament to difference and collaboration without the activity of constructing or assuming sameness.

 

The exhibition has come out of an invitation to match an artist from St. Louis with another from Europe. Rebecca Harris first met director Daniel McGrath in London in 2004 and has since worked intermittently with McGrath on projects, mainly offering written responses to the work presented in shows at Isolation Room, as well as continuing conversations of shared and distinct experiences found in St. Louis, the US, London and Europe. As a response to this Harris invited Williams to present works as the first-half of this duet. She then met Marta Pierobon, and established a dialogue with each, which has continued over a four-month period. Only now are all three in St. Louis. The choice to bring these artists together is not based on similarities in practice, but rather to engage with the disparities in which artists can work and then create artworks through an engagement at home and far from their usual working and living spaces. This has resulted in a number of conversations concerning studio space and the psychological as opposed to the physical spaces of making art.


This is part of a larger project that considers and challenges the idea of practice becoming dependent on points of references, as much as an attempt to rethink methods of how the viewer, critic and art historian engage with artworks. By engaging more with a conceptual space when the working space becomes something unknown we can consider the possibility of becoming free or at least positively unsettled from the conditions of of artistic, curatorial or writing practices.


Rebecca Harris is part of the residency programme at the Luminary, St. Louis. The exhibition at Duet will become part of a larger project resulted from her time here, with details to follow shortly.

 

Download the PDF of the complete exhibition text.

Download the PDF of the exhibition brochure: The Point of ‘Différance’: or Processes of Making (subtitle), Thinking

Written and collated by Rebecca Harris, with additional support by Caitlin Funston

 

 

Marta Pierobon was born 1979 in Brescia, Italy. She attended Academy of Fine Arts , Florence, IT and School for the Arts and the Restoration Palazzo Spinelli , Florence, IT. Her selected solo exhibitions include: SOLOWAY, Brooklyn; MARS, Milan; A Palazzo gallery, Brescia IT; VIAFARINI, Milan; Warehouse Teramo IT; AlbertoAperto, Milan; Neon Gallery FDV, Milan. Her selected group exhibitions include: Museo archeologico di Oderzo, Treviso,IT; Santa Giulia Museum, Brescia, IT; La polverosa, Grosseto,IT; Kate Macgarry, London; corbetta, IT; A Palazzo Gallery, Brescia, IT; Riccardo Crespi Gallery Milan; Neon FDV, Milan IT; 78 Lyndhurst Way, London; San Miniato, Comuine of San Miniato, IT; Estudiotres Chicago. She lives between Brescia and New York.

 

Brett Williams received his Master of Fine Arts in 1998 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago and his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1996 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His selected exhibitions, performances and screenings include: Expo Chicago 2013; Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis; Spiderbug Screening, Chicago; Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis; Yellow Bear Projects, St. Louis; Floor Length and Tux, Chicago; Saint Louis Community College Forest Park; The Luminary Center for the Arts; PSTL Gallery, St. Louis; Open Lot Nashville, Nashville; Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; Nightingale Theater, Chicago; Maps Contemporary Art Space, Belleville, IL; Ellen Curlee Gallery, St. Louis; Boots Contemporary Art Space, St. Louis; Kunstraum Kruezberg/Bethanien, Berlin, Germany; Toy Shop Collective, Brooklyn; Gallery 210, University Missouri St. Louis and White Flag Projects, St. Louis.

 

On completing her undergraduate studies in Art History, Rebecca Harris gained experience in museums and art galleries and in art publishing. She received an MA in Curating at Goldsmiths College and is currently continuing a PhD in Art Theory. Rebecca’s current research practice as a writer and curator is concerned with the moments when art relates to and separately from subject matter and its form as artwork. Considering different modes of engagement that play on the visual and non-visual, she considers the use and implication of using language. Currently she has found that her interests moving towards a more literary method that continues to test how we read and write about the experience of art. Recent writing includes: “The Idea of Line and Form”, Site95 magazine (2012), and a joint article for “Artistic Research” issue, Text zur Kunst, issue 82, (2011). Recent symposia, workshops and presentations include her involvement in After the Archive, UEA and Open University, London (November 2013). Rebecca was invited as a visiting tutor for the Culture, Criticism and Curation course at Central Saint Martins, London (June 2013), and as session facilitator at Research Advisory Group at the Chinese Arts Centre, Manchester (March 2013). She co-led the session titled 'I don’t want to write a PhD’, ICA, London (March 2013) and participated in a residency at Kunsthuis SYB, NL (Summer 2012). Other projects include: A meeting between Arthur T.Danto and Benôit Maire, a project for Palais de Tokyo, (2006), Art after the End of Art, LSE, London, (2006), and Idealondon, ICA, London, (May- June 2005). Rebecca is also in residence with The Luminary this summer.

 

Duet is taking part in this year's CAM Open Studio Day and is presenting a gallery talk/discussion with the artists, curator and director of duet at 2pm on Saturday, June 28.

 


Jacob Dahlgren (Stockholm) and Emily Stremming (St. Louis)

 

September 12 - November 15, 2014

 

 

Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming both make art about analytical precision and the neurotic mindset that goes along with such exactitude.  From behind  Duet’s wall Dahlgren  “infinity loop” of striped forms play on video. On the wall he composes a Neo-concrete ballet made from multicolored anchor points.  These objects are designed to measure our cultural surfeit of consumption and production but instead become the actual subject of contemplation and “The Measure of All Things”. Stremming, on the other hand cuts up photographs of quotidian street and domestic scenes into a grid where the horizontal and vertical axes of the paper strips generate a hallucinatory mosaic. The resulting object records an ironic process: A quick snapshot photograph made to slow down into an epic unit of manual labor.  The industrial character of Dahlgren’s objects, often designed to work with the body to help guide and measure.

 

Jacob Dahlgren (Stockholm, Sweden) is an intelligent, amusing and visually fascinating artist, whose life and art overlap. He makes paintings based on striped t-shirts, eats canned food and constructs happy colored works of sculpture from the empty cans. He can make a sculpture from Ikea clothes hangers or a relief from disposable plastic mugs. Saws, pencils and carpenter’s rulers turn into art in his thoughts and hands. Dahlgren was educated at the Royal Art Academy and has conducted numerous exhibitions and happenings both in Sweden and internationally. In 2007, he represented Sweden in the Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Since then his work has been shown in exhibitions worldwide, including the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; KIASMA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki; Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center/MoMA, New York; Chelsea Art Museum, New York; Kristianstads Konsthall, Kristianstad, Sweden; KIASMA, Helsinki; Workplace Gallery, London; Gumbostrand Konst & Form, Söderkulla, Finland; Nordiska Museet, Stockholm; Galerie Anhava, Helsinki and Andrehn Schiptjenko, Stockholm. His work is in the collections of Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Vehbi Koc Vakfi, Istanbul; Daimler Collection, Berlin; Eskilstuna Konstmuseum; Kiasma, Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki; Nationalmuseum, Stockholm; British Museum, London; Bonniers Collection, Stockholm among others.

 

Emily Stremming (St Louis, USA) received her BFA from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville in 2013. She has exhibited her work at the International Photography Hall of Fame, Sheldon Art Galleries, and PHD Gallery in St. Louis. Her work has been reviewed in Site95 and Lux magazines.Stremming is a photographer currently making images based on scenes in St Louis. Her work examines the nature of surface in a photograph and also plays on the idea of the camera as a machine that shoots and destroys the subject. She spends hour upon hour weaving back together the images into a recognizable handicraft.

School Spirit


Curated by Daniel McGrath


September 9  - 14, 2014


When people from St Louis meet each other elsewhere in the world they often ask: “what high school did you go to?” And the answers  tend to tell you a lot about class, income and family background. The question itself is a sort of running joke. Dahlgren’s ongoing striped T-shirt however, refers to the local universities and their sporting colors. The rivalries and competitive nature of university life abstracted down to a series of color lines and repetitive boundaries.

 

Curated by Daniel McGrath
September 9  - 14, 2014
When people from St Louis meet each other elsewhere in the world they often ask: “what high school did you go to?” And the answers  tend to tell you a lot about class, income and family background. The question itself is a sort of running joke. Dahlgren’s ongoing striped T-shirt however, refers to the local universities and their sporting colors. The rivalries and competitive nature of university life abstracted down to a series of color lines and repetitive boundaries.
Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming

September 12 - November 15, 2014


Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming both make art about analytical precision and the neurotic mindset that goes along with such exactitude.  From behind  Duet’s wall Dahlgren  “infinity loop” of striped forms play on video. On the wall he composes a Neo-concrete ballet made from multicolored anchor points.  These objects are designed to measure our cultural surfeit of consumption and production but instead become the actual subject of contemplation and “The Measure of All Things”. Stremming, on the other hand cuts up photographs of quotidian street and domestic scenes into a grid where the horizontal and vertical axes of the paper strips generate a hallucinatory mosaic. The resulting object records an ironic process: A quick snapshot photograph made to slow down into an epic unit of manual labor.  The industrial character of Dahlgren’s objects, often designed to work with the body to help guide and measure.

Jacob Dahlgren (Stockholm, Sweden) is an intelligent, amusing and visually fascinating artist, whose life and art overlap. He makes paintings based on striped t-shirts, eats canned food and constructs happy colored works of sculpture from the empty cans. He can make a sculpture from Ikea clothes hangers or a relief from disposable plastic mugs. Saws, pencils and carpenter’s rulers turn into art in his thoughts and hands. Dahlgren was educated at the Royal Art Academy and has conducted numerous exhibitions and happenings both in Sweden and internationally. In 2007, he represented Sweden in the Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Since then his work has been shown in exhibitions worldwide, including the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; KIASMA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki; Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center/MoMA, New York; Chelsea Art Museum, New York; Kristianstads Konsthall, Kristianstad, Sweden; KIASMA, Helsinki; Workplace Gallery, London; Gumbostrand Konst & Form, Söderkulla, Finland; Nordiska Museet, Stockholm; Galerie Anhava, Helsinki and Andrehn Schiptjenko, Stockholm. His work is in the collections of Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Vehbi Koc Vakfi, Istanbul; Daimler Collection, Berlin; Eskilstuna Konstmuseum; Kiasma, Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki; Nationalmuseum, Stockholm; British Museum, London; Bonniers Collection, Stockholm among others.

Emily Stremming (St Louis, USA) received her BFA from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville in 2013. She has exhibited her work at the International Photography Hall of Fame, Sheldon Art Galleries, and PHD Gallery in St. Louis. Her work has been reviewed in Site95 and Lux magazines.Stremming is a photographer currently making images based on scenes in St Louis. Her work examines the nature of surface in a photograph and also plays on the idea of the camera as a machine that shoots and destroys the subject. She spends hour upon hour weaving back together the images into a recognizable handicraft.
Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming

September 12 - November 15, 2014


Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming both make art about analytical precision and the neurotic mindset that goes along with such exactitude.  From behind  Duet’s wall Dahlgren  “infinity loop” of striped forms play on video. On the wall he composes a Neo-concrete ballet made from multicolored anchor points.  These objects are designed to measure our cultural surfeit of consumption and production but instead become the actual subject of contemplation and “The Measure of All Things”. Stremming, on the other hand cuts up photographs of quotidian street and domestic scenes into a grid where the horizontal and vertical axes of the paper strips generate a hallucinatory mosaic. The resulting object records an ironic process: A quick snapshot photograph made to slow down into an epic unit of manual labor.  The industrial character of Dahlgren’s objects, often designed to work with the body to help guide and measure.

Jacob Dahlgren (Stockholm, Sweden) is an intelligent, amusing and visually fascinating artist, whose life and art overlap. He makes paintings based on striped t-shirts, eats canned food and constructs happy colored works of sculpture from the empty cans. He can make a sculpture from Ikea clothes hangers or a relief from disposable plastic mugs. Saws, pencils and carpenter’s rulers turn into art in his thoughts and hands. Dahlgren was educated at the Royal Art Academy and has conducted numerous exhibitions and happenings both in Sweden and internationally. In 2007, he represented Sweden in the Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Since then his work has been shown in exhibitions worldwide, including the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; KIASMA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki; Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center/MoMA, New York; Chelsea Art Museum, New York; Kristianstads Konsthall, Kristianstad, Sweden; KIASMA, Helsinki; Workplace Gallery, London; Gumbostrand Konst & Form, Söderkulla, Finland; Nordiska Museet, Stockholm; Galerie Anhava, Helsinki and Andrehn Schiptjenko, Stockholm. His work is in the collections of Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Vehbi Koc Vakfi, Istanbul; Daimler Collection, Berlin; Eskilstuna Konstmuseum; Kiasma, Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki; Nationalmuseum, Stockholm; British Museum, London; Bonniers Collection, Stockholm among others.

Emily Stremming (St Louis, USA) received her BFA from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville in 2013. She has exhibited her work at the International Photography Hall of Fame, Sheldon Art Galleries, and PHD Gallery in St. Louis. Her work has been reviewed in Site95 and Lux magazines.Stremming is a photographer currently making images based on scenes in St Louis. Her work examines the nature of surface in a photograph and also plays on the idea of the camera as a machine that shoots and destroys the subject. She spends hour upon hour weaving back together the images into a recognizable handicraft.
Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming

September 12 - November 15, 2014


Jacob Dahlgren and Emily Stremming both make art about analytical precision and the neurotic mindset that goes along with such exactitude.  From behind  Duet’s wall Dahlgren  “infinity loop” of striped forms play on video. On the wall he composes a Neo-concrete ballet made from multicolored anchor points.  These objects are designed to measure our cultural surfeit of consumption and production but instead become the actual subject of contemplation and “The Measure of All Things”. Stremming, on the other hand cuts up photographs of quotidian street and domestic scenes into a grid where the horizontal and vertical axes of the paper strips generate a hallucinatory mosaic. The resulting object records an ironic process: A quick snapshot photograph made to slow down into an epic unit of manual labor.  The industrial character of Dahlgren’s objects, often designed to work with the body to help guide and measure.

Jacob Dahlgren (Stockholm, Sweden) is an intelligent, amusing and visually fascinating artist, whose life and art overlap. He makes paintings based on striped t-shirts, eats canned food and constructs happy colored works of sculpture from the empty cans. He can make a sculpture from Ikea clothes hangers or a relief from disposable plastic mugs. Saws, pencils and carpenter’s rulers turn into art in his thoughts and hands. Dahlgren was educated at the Royal Art Academy and has conducted numerous exhibitions and happenings both in Sweden and internationally. In 2007, he represented Sweden in the Nordic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Since then his work has been shown in exhibitions worldwide, including the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; KIASMA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki; Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center/MoMA, New York; Chelsea Art Museum, New York; Kristianstads Konsthall, Kristianstad, Sweden; KIASMA, Helsinki; Workplace Gallery, London; Gumbostrand Konst & Form, Söderkulla, Finland; Nordiska Museet, Stockholm; Galerie Anhava, Helsinki and Andrehn Schiptjenko, Stockholm. His work is in the collections of Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Vehbi Koc Vakfi, Istanbul; Daimler Collection, Berlin; Eskilstuna Konstmuseum; Kiasma, Museum of Contemporary Art Helsinki; Nationalmuseum, Stockholm; British Museum, London; Bonniers Collection, Stockholm among others.

Emily Stremming (St Louis, USA) received her BFA from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville in 2013. She has exhibited her work at the International Photography Hall of Fame, Sheldon Art Galleries, and PHD Gallery in St. Louis. Her work has been reviewed in Site95 and Lux magazines.Stremming is a photographer currently making images based on scenes in St Louis. Her work examines the nature of surface in a photograph and also plays on the idea of the camera as a machine that shoots and destroys the subject. She spends hour upon hour weaving back together the images into a recognizable handicraft.

Matthew Isaacson (St. Louis) and Lisa Sanditz (New York)


December 5, 2014 - February 212015


"Yeah the trees, those useless trees." -Pulp
 
Like excited lovers in the park, Sanditz and Isaacson carve their 2d and 3d marks into the sapwood just shy of the heartwood. The gouges swollen and distorted, unrecognizable like an overgrown tree bark and vandalism reabsorbed  by growth. In an attempt to reshape their own worlds via Statacco graffiti. Sanditz leaves a handwritten signature while Isaacson impresses a gestural implosion into clay. The pairing grew out of a dual interest in agriculturalproduction and the overabundance of nature in the Midwestern landsc
ape. 


Read an interview with the artist Lisa Sanditz in this issue of Painting is Dead: http://www.paintingisdead.com/lisa-sanditz.html


Matthew Isaacson received his MFA in 2007 in Ceramics from Virginia Commonwealth University. In 2004, he earned his BFA, Minor in Music, from Western Michigan University. He also attended Alfred State University of New York, Alfred Summer Ceramics Studio Intensive and earned his Associate of Arts, Northwestern Michigan College. His selected exhibitions include: Duane Reed Gallery, St. Louis; Luminary Center of Arts, St. Louis; Dinderbeck Studios, Grand Rapids MI; S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, Pittsburgh PA; Taylor University, Upland IN; Pilchuck Glass School Faculty Exhibition, Stanwood WA; CSU, University Hall, Experimental Theatre, Columbus GA; CSU Bay Gallery, Columbus State University, GA; True F. Luck Gallery VACR, Richmond, VA; FE Gallery, Pittsburgh PA; Plant Zero, Richmond VA; Play SPACE Gallery, CA College of the Arts, San Francisco CA; and the Kalamazoo Institute of Art, Kalamazoo MI. He lives and works in St. Louis.


Lisa Sanditz was born in St. Louis and earned her Master of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute in 2001 and her Bachelor of Arts in 1995 from Macalester College, St. Paul. She also studied at the Studio Art Center International, Florence, Italy. Her selected solo exhibitions include shows at ACME Gallery, Los Angeles;Rodolphe Janssen Gallery, Brussels; CRG Gallery, New York; Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; Onefront\Gallery, New York and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. Her selected group exhibitions include CRG Gallery, New York; Priska Juschka Gallery, New York; Julie Saul Gallery, New York. AcmeGallery, Los Angeles; Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; American Academy in Rome, Rome, Italy;Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Leawood, KS; Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE; Geoffrey Young Gallery, Great Barrington, MA; Galeria Fenando Zubillaga, Caracas, Venezuela; Orange County Museum of Art, Orange County, CA; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH, curated by Helen Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Los Angeles; Galerie Tanit, Munich; Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH; and The Queens Museum, Queens, NY. Sanditz has work in the collection of the St. Louis Art Museum and lives and works in Brooklyn.


 

 

Robert Goetz (St. Louis) and Thomas Harris (Los Angeles)

March 6 - May 2, 2015

 

Every society in every time has had its masks that suited the mood of the society, from the elegance of a Venetian Masked Ball to the occidental theatrics of the Jihadi in a balaklava to the airbrushed war paint of female makeup. People want to act out a feeling inside themselves—anger, sadness, happiness, lust via the mask. It may be a sad commentary on present-day America that horror masks are the best sellers. If you know the construction of a painting, you have a wood frame and you stretch canvas over it. So that structure is kind of important, and you can’t really go beyond that, eventually the image is a mask the structure wears and the face grows to fit it.

Harris’s objects are boxes and Goetz’s are prints. Both sets act as masks. If you see the conventional painting frame, it’s kind of thin. But in Harris’s case, wood stretcher bars become a box to then stretch material over it and produce sound. His work here is loosely based on Halloween III’s plot to replace children with Androids which was a low rent thriller from the first frame, including a skull, a lime-green witch and an orange jack-o'-lantern.

 

Goetz’s prints of Apes reveal the debased primate behind the human mask. His apes exhibit the ability to imitate intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human…just not a very admirable or desirable set of humans though.

 

*Photographs by Joe Hellberg

 

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

Robert Goetz's work combines printmaking, sculpture, sound and installation. He teaches Printmaking and Art Appreciation at East Central Community College in Union, MO. He received his MFA in Printmaking and Drawing from Washington University in St. Louis. His selected group exhibitions include: Monte Vista Projects, Los Angeles; the Hunt Gallery at Webster University, The Regional Arts Commission, Sheldon Art Galleries in St. Louis, among other venues. Goetz lives and works in St. Louis and is co-founder of yellow bear projects.

 

Thomas Harris was born in Bristol, UK in 1975. He received his BFA in Sculpture in 1997 from the University of Lancashire, United Kingdom and his MFA in Sculpture in 2001 from The University of Texas at Austin. His selected group exhibitions include: Monte Vista at T.A.M: 12 Gauge Series, Torrance Art Museum, Torrance, CA, 2010; Resound, Hunt Gallery, St. Louis, 2010; Sound Series 01: performed as part of J.U.B. with Lauren Lavitt and Brandon Engstrom, Elder Street, Los Angeles, 2009; LAX: group show, Los Angeles Airport, Los Angeles, 2008; Collaborative performance with Lauren Lavitt, The Box Gallery, Los Angeles, 2008; Orchard Project, Pirate, Burford, U.K. 2005; Collaborative project with Ian Pedigo, Fluent Collaborative, Austin, 2004; The Jack S. Blanton Museum, Austin, 2001; Revelations Texas, in conjunction with the International Sculpture Conference, The University of Houston, 2000. Harris lives and works in Los Angeles for Paul McCarthy's studio.



 



 



Caitlin Aasen (St. Louis) and Vusal Rahim (Baku, Azerbaijan)


May 22- July 17 2015


 

Duet is pleased to announce an exhibition featuring American artist Caitlin Aasen (Duet Gallery) and Azerbaijani artist Vusal Rahim (YAY Gallery). To mark the first time these two artists have been displayed together, this exhibition creates a dialogue between their two cultures through their approaches to abstract painting. The exhibition is co-curated by Daniel McGrath (Director of Duet Gallery in St. Louis, USA) and Lana Sokolova (Local Programmes Director, YARAT Contemporary Art Space, Baku, Azerbaijan).


Vusal Rahim is exhibiting a series of paintings that build on the highly personal style he has developed in previous work. Rahim breaks down the recognizable features of the human figure on each canvas into abstract forms, bringing them together with fluid, broad brush-strokes and a striking color palette. The dynamic sense of movement in the works gives them a frenetic energy which Rahim controls with patterning and careful compositions.


Caitlin Aasen’s paintings, exhibited alongside, provide a counterpoint to Rahim’s works. Her paper and canvas surfaces are veiled in stained rivulets, thin washes and expanses of faded color. As layer upon layer of washed-out color build to suggest seemingly natural but unrecognisable forms, her work evokes an absence. Whereas control and energy, order and dynamism are evident in Rahim’s work through the traces of the artist’s hand, Aasen’s work is mute, giving little away about its creator.

 

Director and co-curator Daniel McGrath explains:

"I had the opportunity to meet Lana Sokolova when she was on a residency in St. Louis with CEC Arts Link last October. We discussed then the possibility of co-curating an exhibition at Duet. Lana chose Vusal Rahim’s work to be paired alongside Caitlin Aasen’s because she thought their abstract approach to painting created an interesting and thought-provoking pairing.”

 

Local Programmes Director at YARAT and co-curator Lana Sokolova highlights:

“When I first saw Caitlin’s paintings, I remembered some abstract sketches I had seen at Vusal’s studio. I selected him to accompany Caitlin because there is a strong parallel of abstract distancing of reality in both artists’ works. Caitlin and Vusal both use bright and saturated colors and their paintings show an instinctive understanding of the emotive properties of color. As YARAT Contemporary Art Space is aiming to create dialogues between different cultures, this seems to be a good chance to move forward with our goals. Art creates a valuable opportunity to make connections between the young artists of Azerbaijan and the Unites States.”

 

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES:

Vusal Rahim received his artistic education from the Azerbaijan State Academy of Art. He is represented by YAY Gallery and has exhibited nationally and internationally. He held a solo show entitled Black Woman at YAY Gallery (Baku, Azerbaijan) and his group exhibitions include: BACARART Project, Azerbaijan; HomeSweet Home, Azerbaijani Cultural Center, Paris; The Circle of Peace, Writers House of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia; Commonist, YARAT Contemporary Art Centre, Baku, Azerbaijan; IV International Symposium on Turkic Culture, Art and Cultural Heritage, Milan, Italy; Iz (‘Trace’), Azerbaijan National Museum of History, Baku, Azerbaijan.


Caitlin Aasen received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Missouri – St. Louis and is currently pursuing her Master of Fine Arts in Painting at Washington University in St. Louis. This is her first multiple-artist exhibition.

 

ABOUT THE CURATORS:

Daniel McGrath is an adjunct professor in the art department at Lindenwood University in St. Louis. In 2005, he received his Master of Arts from Kings College at the University of London. In 2000, he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts from UCLA. McGrath is also co-director of Isolation Room/Gallery Kit in St. Louis and was co-curator of Sweetboy Projects in Los Angeles and has organized exhibitions in St. Louis, Los Angeles, Copenhagen and Oxford, UK. He is a contributing art writer for Art Papers, Art US, Sculpture and Site 95. He has exhibited his work at The Fabrikken, Copenhagen; Hunter College MFA Studios, New York; Office Space, Los Angeles; SweetboyProjects, Los Angeles; Pirate, Burford, UK; Good Citizen, St. Louis; PSTL, St. Louis; Hunt Gallery, St. Louis and The Luminary Center for the Arts, St. Louis. He lives and works between
Oxford (United Kingdom) and St. Louis (Missouri, USA).

 

Lana Sokolova is Local Programs Director at YARAT Contemporary Art Space in Baku, Azerbaijan. She manages the creative development and delivery of local programs with a large outreach, drawing together a network of cultural institutions in both Europe and Asia to collaborate with YARAT on education initiatives, exhibitions and exchanges. Her projects focus on urban revival and cultural dialogue. In 2013, she organized the public art festival Participate. Themed around interaction, the festival placed the work of artists from Azerbaijan, the United Kingdom, Russia, USA, Georgia and the Netherlands at different sites around Baku.



ABOUT DUET GALLERY:

Duet is an exhibition series and curatorial endeavor devoted to meaningful pairings between artists from St. Louis and a carefully chosen complimentary artist from another city, offering up both a comparison and contrast of the cultural landscape that influences each of the artist’s work. Located in Grand Center, the series includes artists that are working in a variety of media and exploring subjects unique to their geography. This curatorial project is underwritten by Ken and Nancy Kranzberg, whose support of local artists has been a sustained commitment for over twenty-five years, allowing artists valuable exposure to new audiences within and beyond the region.

 

ABOUT YAY GALLERY

Located in the heart of Baku’s Old City, YAY Gallery sits within a designated UNESCO world heritage site. The gallery was founded by YARAT, a non-profit contemporary art organisation, as part of their commitment to support the art infrastructure in Azerbaijan. The gallery is a social enterprise: YAY (meaning ‘share’ in Azerbaijani) shares all proceeds from sales of work between the artists and YARAT’s activities and programs. In addition to six exhibitions a year, the gallery has rapidly established a strong following for its program of talks and publications. Artists represented by YAY Gallery have gone on to take part in residencies and exhibitions internationally. Faig Ahmed was nominated for the prestigious Jameel Prize in 2013 and exhibited at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. In June 2014, Nazrin Mammadova, Rashad Alakbarov and Farid Rasulov took part in Delfina Foundation’s respected residency in London.

 

If Not Now, When?

 

Rennie Behrend, Laura Bise, Blair Tramel, Molly Zuckerman-Hartung

 

August 7 - August 21, 2015


Duet is pleased to announce If Not Now, When? a pop-up group exhibition curated by Eve Maret.


The act of creation presents a field of limitless possibility. For the artist, the blank page or canvas is paralyzing; the freedom to forge one’s own taste breeds dizzying anxiety. These anxieties arguably form the core of the pleasure of creative acts.  Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard refers to creating as a means to “destroy what one has clung to”, namely decisions that kill one’s identification with the moribund past and attachment to unsatisfying patterns within oneself. Anxiety over decisions is the ego’s sense of its own mortality. Yet death and rebirth are essential to the creative process, and if this organic cycle is embraced, boundless potential is transformed into the tangible. If Not Now, When? is an interpretation of presence in the process of art-making as understood by artists Rennie Behrend, Laura Bise, Blair Tramel and Molly Zuckerman-Hartung. The work featured in If Not Now, When? offers a glimpse into the realm that lies beyond the clutter created by indecisiveness, art is now, accessible each and every moment. The immediacy of
the present; manifests as mark making, the embrace of a new medium and experimentation.

 

Laura Bise relates, “Art can be the tension in a person made tangible.” Satisfaction flows from transforming that tension into a thing of beauty or utility; the object is an articulation of humanity’s primary and most natural function: to create. Paradoxically, one assumes the role of divine creator in the process of giving birth to objects by which the world is defined.

 

In essence, the artists presented in If Not Now, When? embrace and thusly relinquish the anxiety associated with creation. The work of Behrend, Bise, Zuckerman-Hartung and Tramel is an embodiment of surrender to the present moment and its ineffable contents.


Click here for an article about If Not Now, When? http://www.stlmag.com/arts/visual-arts



ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

 

Rennie Behrend received a Bachelor of General Studies with an emphasis in Applied Arts from the University of Missouri in 1981. In 1984, he received his MFA at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. After completing his studies, Behrend went on to teach Drawing, Figure Drawing, Design, and Painting courses at St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley from 1987 until 1991. He was an instructor of a variety of classes within the Art Department at St. Louis Community College at Meramec, where he also assumed the role as the school’s Gallery Director for several years. After twenty-four years of teaching, Behrend retired in May 2015. He has participated in both group and solo exhibition in St. Louis and the surrounding area. He continues to make work at his studio in Sunset Hills, Missouri.

 

Laura Bise is a multimedia artist and musician focusing on the generative processes of controlled decay and recursive systems alongside authentic gestures to make decisions in paintings, sculpture, and sound. The work combines elements of the natural, organic and instinctual with the structural systemization of processing to create pieces that impose historically informed compositional deliberation while ultimately speaking to their place within the present day. Laura will graduate from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2016. She has both performed and displayed artwork at a number of Chicago-area exhibition venues.

 

Blair Tramel is an emerging artist that lives and works in Nashville, Tennessee where she recently received her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from Vanderbilt University with an emphasis in animation and video art. She recently had her first solo show at Vanderbilt University Fine Art Gallery and has been creating incessantly ever since. With a passion for storytelling, Blair has recently become interested in the art of puppetry giving each character familiar, human-like personalities and mannerisms. Blair recently participated in the Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Art Show in Nashville, Tennessee.


Molly Zuckerman-Hartung was born in 1975 in Los Gatos, CA, and lives and works in Chicago. She received her MFA in 2007 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her works are included in the collections of The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; and the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Painter, Painter at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Program at ReMap4, Athens, Greece; Michelle Grabner: I Work From Home, MOCA Cleveland; Shakti at Brand New Gallery, Milan, Italy and a solo exhibition, Chlorophyll Blues at Diana Lowenstein, Miami. She was also included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial 2014 and Violet Fogs Azure Snot at Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago.


Juan William Chávez (St. Louis) and

Chemi Rosado-Seijo (Vega Alta, Puerto Rico)

 

 

Through December 12, 2015

 

Working on board shipping in the Mississippi isn’t the exuberant scene as depicted by George Caleb Bingham in his classic Jolly Flat Boatmen, 1846.  It’s actually lethal.  Instead of a quaintly romantic experience with po’folk dancing a jig on the deck, these flimsy boats regularly sank with all hands. Bingham must have had quite an imagination to conceive his masterwork; in fact, I’d guess most boatmen would have laughed up their sleeves at the picture after cursing him out. The flatboat’s mega-industrial grandchildren, AKA the barges and tugs seen on the river today, crash and overturn regularly. Pilots are legally required to fish corpses out of the grizzly mud banks as a reminder that catastrophe is only an uncharted sandbar or a careless moment away. Chemi Rosado-Seijo (Puerto Rico) and Juan William Chávez (St Louis) are both interested in the slightly less dangerous “wipe out” of skateboarding for Duet’s upcoming exhibition.  Both artists plan to work with damaged and crushed barge hulls to build skate ramps and half pipes in the gallery. Various drawings and films will complement these repurposed objects, juxtaposing the skate culture of each artist’s hometown. The vernacular materials of work and the whimsical impulse of extreme sport come to together in a jolly tribute to the menacing river and the industrious people who work on it.

 

ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

 

Juan William Chávez is an artist and cultural activist who explore the potential of space through creative initiatives that address community and cultural issues. His studio practice incorporates drawings, films, photographs, and architectural interventions, unconventional forms of beekeeping and agriculture that utilize art as a way of researching, developing and implementing socially-engaged projects. He has received awards and grants from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Creative Capital, Kindle Project, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Art Matters, the Gateway Foundation, Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council. Chávez holds a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

Born in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, Chemi Rosado-Seijo graduated from the painting department of the Puerto Rico School of Visual Arts in 1997. In 1998, he worked with Michy Marxuach to open a gallery that transformed into a not-for-profit organization presenting resources and exhibitions for contemporary artists in Puerto Rico. In 2000, Rosado had his first solo show at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona, including interventions on billboards around the city. Since 2002, he has worked with residents of the El Cerro community, a poor neighborhood south of San Juan, to present public art projects, workshops and other community initiatives. In 2006, he inaugurated La Perla’s Bowl, a sculpture built with residents of San Juan’s La Perla community that functions as both a skateboarding ramp and an actual pool. Since 2009, Rosado-Seijo has been organizing exhibitions in his apartment in Santurce, creating a center for meeting and exchange in the Puerto Rican contemporary art scene.

 

Variable Views of Functional Art


January 15 - February 6, 2016


Curated by Kelsey McGinnis

Duet is host to a new exhibition playing on the different ways people interpret ceramics works based on the context in which they’re being shown. Ceramic artwork straddles the line between housewares and fine art. Variable Views of Functional Art poses the question: how does the role of ceramics change installed in a gallery environment versus displayed on a kitchen shelf? Ceramic works by Columbia, Missouri based artist Sarah Harker and Washington University Fellow Kahlil Irving present two different concepts of wares; Harker creating functional pieces and Irving creating sculpture meant to comment on a larger idea. 

Variable Views of Functional Art furthermore hopes to create a unique context for the idea of space in the works presented. Works by Michael Byron, Daniel Raedeke and Luanne Rimel that depict sculptural objects within a two-dimensional plane are paired with ceramic sculpture that toy with the visual relationship of space and the overall environment. They set the tone with the sculptures and help to change the idea of "space" in the gallery setting.

Jarred Gastreich (St. Louis) and Christian Movila (Bucharest)



March 4 - April 23, 2016


Jarred Gastreich and Cristian Movila come together at Duet as a reflection on the complicated relationship between subjectivity, meaning and cultural society as well as a touching dedication to the streets in which their photographs were shot. A special significance toward the “shooting” of a photograph also haunts the juxtaposition of artists. Gastreich was present as a photojournalist during the disturbances in St. Louis following the shooting of Michael Brown and he captures not only the tension of that time, but also the quieter moments. Movila was present in Paris during the Bataclan massacre and shoots the bewildered response to those events as they unfold. The personal significance of many of these photographs and their wider symbolic meaning collapses a world that has shattered and ceased to be and events as yet to be fully understood.

 

Gastreich has photographed for publications such as the Riverfront Times among others and will be relocating to Chicago. Movila has photographed for publications such as the New York Times, Smithsonian Magazine and Time Magazine among many others. He lives and works in Bucharest.

 

Further reading:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/photographer-cristian-movils-eyewitness-photos-attack-paris-and-its-aftermath-180957338/?no-ist

 

 

Brandon Engstrom (Los Angeles) and Kevin (St. Louis)


May 6 - July 30, 2016


Duet’s new show separates out the artistic production methods. Kevin produced by an anonymous collective based in St Louis in Duet’s front room crawlspace echoes the bunker-like interior of the gallery. Titled Kevin, 2016, each object inside is an individual record of the Kevin entity, yet the whole production of ephemera forms a potentially limitless crowd. Kevin’s teeming underground existence physically defines a dank occluded mental space.  These are notes from the underground: “What is to be done with the millions of facts that bear witness that men, consciously, that is fully understanding their real interests, have left them in the background and have rushed headlong on another path” by an underground figure as absurd as he is obscure. “to meet peril and danger, compelled to this course by nobody and by nothing, but, as it were, simply disliking the beaten track, and have obstinately, willfully, struck out another difficult, absurd way, seeking it almost in the darkness…” In the end Kevin is watching. As the viewer chasing a fugitive sensation you become the ‘pursuant’ for your own conscience.

 

Engstrom’s installation Path to Consumption, 2016 depicts a “Tearing and consuming” of cast candy female buttocks by a ratline of nocturnal rodents. Engstrom stored his carb-rich sculptures in a gritty apartment in LA’s K-town. He was shocked to find that the sculptures were gnawed at each night. Smaller residents, living in the wall recesses of the building became his harshest critics literally consuming his work.   Undeterred by the setback he set up cameras and recorded the grizzly cannibalization “till the bitterness turns into a sort of shameful accursed sweetness, and at last – into positive real enjoyment!” Much like the narrator in Notes from the Underground who explores the enjoyment of Toothache as a willfully irrational act of defiance, Engstrom uses the insatiable appetites of rodents to determine his own uncertainty and hesitations.

 

Brandon Engstrom has had a recent solo exhibition at LAXart in Los Angeles and works as senior staff at artist Paul McCarthy’s studio. Engstrom worked in the Hollywood film industry for many years (see his IMDB here: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1913779/ ) he lives and works in Los Angeles.


Robin Assner-Alvey (St. Louis) and

Dean Kessmann (Washington, DC)


October 7 - November 26, 2016



For Duet’s next exhibition, artist’s Robin Assner-Alvey (St. Louis) and Dean Kessmann (Washington D.C.) both play with malfunction and the technical hiccup. The glitch signifies something wrong, or something bothersome that you can’t quite put your finger on, here each artist uses the digital photograph to highlight that mechanical encounter.  Assner-Alvey combines the ghostly apparition as a series of abstractions that radiate in layers from the edge of the figure to the edge of the frame.  A photocopy of a photocopy of a photocopy, deepening to the point that recognition completely breaks down and where lovely colors and shapes play. Kessmann fuses the graphic designer’s individual utilitarian layout for printer’s registration marks and CMYK color management bar with an extended blowup that ultimately reveals that color is never quite balanced and is always somehow misaligned.  


Artist Biographies:


Robin Assner-Alvey received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Connecticut in 2000 and her Master of Fine Arts from the Ohio State University in 2002. Her selected solo exhibitions include: Good Citizens Gallery, St. Louis; Duluth Art Institute, Duluth, MN; Roger Williams University, Providence; Ellen Curlee Gallery, St. Louis; Aron Packer Gallery, Chicago; The Broad Street Gallery, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia, Athens; Hopkins Hall Gallery, Columbus; Hoyt L. Sherman Studios, Columbus. Her selected group exhibitions include: Philip Slein Gallery, St. Louis; The Cecile R. Hunt Gallery, Webster University, St. Louis; Pearl Conrad Gallery, OSU-Mansfield, Mansfield, OH; Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis;Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee; Contemporary Museum of Art, St. Louis; University Art Museum, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder; Gallery NuLu, Louisville and Boots Contemporary Art Space, St. Louis among others. In addition Assner-Alvey is a part of two different art collaborations, one with local sound artist Adam Watkins. Also for the past ten years, she has been collaborating with visual artist, Sarah Nitschke on a photographic and installation project called Acts of Hope and Futility. Acts of Hope and Futility a long-term, multi-part, multi-disciplinary series of artworks. Assner-Alvey is Associate Professor of Art in the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts at Webster University in St. Louis,


Dean Kessmann earned his MFA in 1996 from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. His selected collections include: Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore; Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago; Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME; Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando; Arlington County Public Art Program, Arlington, VA; Museum of Contemporary Religious Art, St. Louis; A.G. Edwards Corporate Art Collection, St. Louis and The George Washington University Art Collection, Washington, DC. Kessmann’s recent selected solo exhibitions include: Arlington Arts Center, Arlington, VA; Furthermore, Washington, DC; Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando; Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC; Humanity Center Galleries, California State University, Chico, CA; White Flag Projects, St. Louis; Regina Gouger Miller Gallery, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg; Gallery 1101, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; William Shearburn Fine Art, St. Louis and School 33 Art Center, Baltimore, MD. His recent selected group exhibitions include: Brady Art Gallery, Washington, DC; The Photographic Resource Center, Boston; Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY; Yeiser Art Center, Paducah; Wheaton College, Norton, MA; Meyerhoff Gallery, MICA, Baltimore; American University Museum at the Katzen Art Center, Washington, DC; Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, Wilmington, DE; The American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC; Strathmore Fine Art, North Bethesda, MD; Cerasoli Gallery, Los Angeles; Ellen; Curlee Gallery, St. Louis and Curris Gallery, Murray State University among others. Kessmann is Associate Professor of Photography at The George Washington University and lives and works in Washington, DC and is represented by William Shearburn Gallery, St. Louis.





A Taste of Art


Carrie Juenger, Chelsea McDaniel, Sherry Xiao and Katie Yun


Curated by Mallory Simon, Duet Gallery Assistant


On View Through January 21, 2016


Katie Yun and Sherry Xaio, senior art students at Washington University come together with Carrie Juenge rand Chelsea McDaniel, senior art students at Webster University in the exhibition A Taste of Art. Food consumption is an everyday necessity but the kind of food many consume often relates back to their culture, class, age and memories. Each artist incorporates food into their artwork in various ways to highlight these concepts while intriguing the senses. These ideas are explored through many mediums such as sculpture, video art, collage, painting, rubbings and photography. 


 

Jay Lizo (Los Angeles) and Eve Maret (St. Louis)

 

 

March 17 - May 20, 2017

 

 

Los Angeles-based artist Jay Lizo’s work Microphones, 2016 stand as a mute poet, the resins mimic the form and function of the voice like sweet treacle, yet what is important about these objects cannot be put into words.  Sound artist Eve Maret’s audio installation stands as a blind painting evoking memories, dreams and nightmares as a private vision. The combination of works is about unfathomable expressions, the sounds shapes and colors. This particular pairing is also about "seeing" and "recording" the way memory plays on the surface of things, in contrast from the things in front of our eyes and in our ears. The spatial relationship between these artworks play with both the sensation of sight and the mysteries of representation.

 


Artist Biographies

 

Jay Lizo received his MFA in 2005 at University of California - Santa Barbara and BFA at Ringling School of Art and Design. Lizo's work has been included in exhibitions at Blum and Poe Gallery in Los Angeles, New Americans Museum in San Diego, High Desert Test Sites in Joshua Tree, Angels Gate Cultural Center in San Pedro, Torrance Art Museum, Oxnard, Cypress, and Long Beach Colleges, Eagle Rock Center for the Arts, Los Angeles’ Elephant Space, Raid Projects, Seeline Gallery, and Kristi Engle Gallery; in addition to exhibitions in St. Louis, MO, New York, NY, and Austria. Lizo lives and works in Los Angeles where he is Sculpture Technician at USC - Roski School of Art and Design.

 

Eve Maret received her BBA from Belmont University in December 2016. She exhibited a series of stills at the Old Orchard Gallery in St. Louis last February from her video series entitled Wake to You. Maret has created album artwork for a number of Nashville area bands has collaborated with filmmakers from the Southeast and Western US (Lost in the Supermarket, 2016 and INVOCATION, 2016), contributing both musical scores and sound design. Maret self-released her first album, Say So, in July 2016. Maret currently resides in Nashville, where she writes and performs music.